Tag Archive: home economics


For many years, I’d believed there were cleaners that were best for jewelry. I’d heard of using Mr. Clean and hot water. I’d heard of using toothpaste. Of course, there are those expensive cleaners and even more expensive sonic contraptions. One day I asked my jeweler what is best. Really, all you need is:

Hot water, rubbing alcohol, a clean soft toothbrush, and maybe a Q-Tip.

Get the water in your tap nice and hot. Give the piece a rinse. Dip your toothbrush in the rubbing alcohol, and scrub the jewelry on top, sides, and especially underneath. Get the bristles in all those hard-to-reach places. Keep dipping your toothbrush in the alcohol as needed. The alcohol will cut the oils and dirt in the piece. When you’re done scrubbing, give it another rinse under HOT water, shake the excess water off, and set aside to dry. The heat should help it dry quickly. If any water spots remain, polish them out with the Q-Tip.

Home Economics

Excerpted from “Foods, Nutrition and Home Management Manual,” Home Economics Circular No. 1 (revised), published by the Government of the Province of British Colombia in 1951.

(This was my mother’s old home economics book.)

Milk

Milk is one of our most imortant foods. When we drink milk we should remember that we are taking a real food and not merely something to take the place of water. When enough milk is used, some other food can be left out of the diet. Milk contains all the foodstuffs and is almost a perfect food. Milk is, however, more nearly a perfect food for very young infants than for adults, so we may term it an almost perfect food for infants and a good food for grown persons.

Although milk contains a small amount of iron, it is insufficient for the needs of the baby after the supply stored in his body at birth is used up. The milk diet is then supplemented with such iron foods as egg-yolk and green vegetables. If the milk is pasteurized, Vitamin C is destroyed and the shortage is made up by giving the child orange-juice or tomato juice. For further protection against a shortage of Vitamins A and D, cod-liver oil is frequently prescribed.

Home Economics

Excerpted from “Foods, Nutrition and Home Management Manual,” Home Economics Circular No. 1 (revised), published by the Government of the Province of British Colombia in 1951.

(This was my mother’s old home economics book.)

Water

Water and milk are the two most important beverages. We need from 4 – 6 glasses of water per day.

Boiling-point of water

In heating water the temperature gradually rises.

1. First we see tiny bubbles coming up from the bottom. These are merely air-bubbles. Air is dissolved in the water and, when heated, the air expands and comes to the surface.

2. Water that is “lukewarm” feels neither hot nor cold. Use a thermometer to find the temperature. A practical test is to place a drop on the wrist.

3. When big steam bubbles begin to rise but break on the surface and disappear, the water is “simmering.” Find the temperature.

4. Water is boiling when it reaches the temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit at sea-level. Steam bubbles come up so large and so rapidly that the surface of the water of no longer level. At this stage we say the water is at a “full rolling boil.”

Home Economics

Excerpted from “Foods, Nutrition and Home Management Manual,” Home Economics Circular No. 1 (revised), published by the Government of the Province of British Colombia in 1951.

(This was my mother’s old home economics book.)

Table of Measures

3 tsp.              = 1 TBSP.

12 TBSP         = 1 cup wet material (milk, water, etc.)

16 TBSP         = 1 cup dry material

2 cups            = 1 pint

2 pints           = 1 quart

4 quarts        = 1 gallon

8 quarts        = 1 peck (dry)

4 cups flour sifted once             = 1 pound

2 cups butter packed solid       = 1 pound

2 cups chopped meat                  = 1 pound

2-1/2 cups corn meal                  = 1 pound

3-1/2 cups Graham flour            = 1 pound

1-3/4 cups rice                                = 1 pound

5-1/2 cups rolled oats                  = 1 pound

2 cups granulated sugar              = 1 pound

2-2/3 cups brown sugar              = 1 pound

2-3/4 cups icing sugar                 = 1 pound

4-1/2 cups ground coffee           = 1 pound

3-1/2 cups cocoa                           = 1 pound

3 TBSP cocoa                                   = 1 square of chocolate

1 square baker’s chocolate         = 1 ounce

4 cups grated cheese                    = 1 pound

Juice of one lemon                        = 3 TBSP

1 cup uncooked rice                     = 3 cups cooked rice

1 cup cream                                      = 3 cups whipped cream

Home Economics

Excerpted from “Foods, Nutrition and Home Management Manual,” Home Economics Circular No. 1 (revised), published by the Government of the Province of British Colombia in 1951.

(This was my mother’s old home economics book.)

Rules for Marketing

1. Patronize only reliable merchants who give first-class service.

2. Markets should be sanitary and clerks should be neat and clean in appearance and in their habit of handling foods.

3. It is most advisable to go to market and make one’s own selection instead of ordering by telephone.

4. Order-lists should be made out at home before going to market. Daily marketing should not be necessary. By making out menus two or three days in advance, supplies may be ordered for these meals on one marketing trip and so save the time of the home-maker and extra deliveries for the merchant. A marketing-list should be kept in the kitchen on which should be noted items that are getting low.

5. Be courteous and considerate in your demands for service. It shows a lack of planning to ask for more than one delivery a day.

6. Check the list with delivered groceries to see that the order is filled correctly. Check items as to cost.

7. Marketing should be done as early in the day as possible, so that supplies may be selected when fresh and while there is the best selection, and also to allow time for early delivery.

8. Staples such as flour and sugar, etc., should be bought in quantity if storage space is available. Perishable foods should be bought in small quantities every day or two.

9. Buy foods that are in season when the prices are low. Foods out of season are always high on account of transportation and hothouse conditions. High prices do not signify quality.

10. The price of goods should always be know before buying, and when the price is too high the home-maker should be able to substitute another food of equal value for less money.

11. Ask for food by weight or measure, not by the quarter’s worth of the dime’s worth.

12. Canned foods should be ordered by the size number on the can and by the special brand desired. Usually No. 2 and No. 3 are used in the average home. It is advisable to try several brands until one has determined the best value.

13. Canned goods should be bought by the case when a quantity is to be used.

14. If cans have damaged or faded labels or are bulged in any way, the product is likely to be inferior and should be avoided.

15. Canned vegetables improve in flavour if the can is opened and the contents are emptied and left exposed to the air for some time before heating.

16. Packaged foods command higher prices than foods bought in bulk. One must determine of the extra cost is desirable.

Home Economics

Excerpted from “Foods, Nutrition and Home Management Manual,” Home Economics Circular No. 1 (revised), published by the Government of the Province of British Colombia in 1951.

(This was my mother’s old home economics book.)

Rules for Healthy, Happy School Children

1. Eat food slowly and at regular intervals.

2. Eat cooked cereal with milk for breakfast frequently.

3. Drink 3 to 4 glasses of milk daily.

4. Drink 4 to 6 glasses of water daily.

5. Drink no tea or coffee until 20 years of age. (!)

6. Eat eggs three or four times a week, and meat not more than once a day.

7. Eat plenty of fruit.

8. Eat raw vegetables at least twice a week.

9. Eat daily a vegetable in addition to potatoes.

10. Eat milk desserts rather than pastry.

11. Eat very little candy. (Only after meals.)

12. Aid the digestion of food by doing the following: —

(1) Exercising two hours each day.

(2) Bathing at least twice a week.

(3) Keeping windows open at night.

(4) Sleeping as many hours as the following table indicates: —

Age                           Hours of Sleep

5 – 6                          13

6 – 8                          12

8 – 10                       11.5

10 – 12                     11

12 – 14                     10.5

14 – 16                     10

16 – 18                     9.5

 

 

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