Tag Archive: biology


Doctor Mike says, “Caitlin Doughty is the creator behind the YouTube channel “Ask A Mortician” where she normalizes death and educates her audience about what happens after… well… you know. Being the brilliant mortician she is, I thought it would make a lot of sense for us to not react to a medical drama, but a death drama, so we watched HBO’s Six Feet Under. Despite my years of medical training and experience, there isn’t a lot I know about what happens to the human body after it dies, so Caitlin enlightened me to things such as what happens to prosthetics, the smells of a mortuary, and what happens to your various orifices.”

Ten Famous Human Oddities

There was a time when traveling circuses and freak shows were the preeminent form of entertainment of the day. Some people made a great living as human oddities, showing off their natural (and unnatural) bodies. Here are ten of the most famous.

Twins can be a lot more complicated than just identical or fraternal, and the rarer types of twins suggest that we have a lot more to learn about human development.

How Humans Lost Their Fur

We’re the only primate without a coat of thick fur. It turns out that this small change in our appearance has had huge consequences for our ability to regulate our body temperature, and ultimately, it helped shape the evolution of our entire lineage.

For some reason, animals keep evolving into things that look like crabs, independently, over and over again. What is it about the crab’s form that makes it so evolutionarily successful that non-crabs are apparently jealous of it?

How We Domesticated Dogs

We’re still figuring out the details, but most scientists agree that it took thousands of years of interactions to develop our deep bond with dogs. When did they first become domesticated? Where did this happen? And what did the process look like, in terms of genetics and anatomy?

How We Domesticated Cats

A 9,500 year old burial in Cyprus represents some of the oldest known evidence of human/cat companionships anywhere in the world. But when did this close relationship between humans and cats start? And how did humans help cats take over the world?

YouTuber Life in Jars? says, “A year ago I made this huge natural native saltwater ecosphere in a jar. It has had a lot of ups and downs, but to this day is still very successful. The ecosphere has housed crabs, starfish and a lot more and is currently still housing a lot of crustaceans, paramecium, worms, other invertebrates and even spionid worms.”

Inside this terrarium there is a variety of organisms. All of which have persisted within the closed ecosystem for generations. Originally this terrarium was home to a lot more plant and isopod species, however as the years went by biodiversity was lost as the new ecosystem balanced out. Currently the ecosystem is experiencing cycles. As the plant population increased, so did the isopods. This caused the isopod population to graze on a lot of the terrariums plants, causing the plant population to decrease. I imagine centipede populations may increase in future giving the plants the opportunity to recover. I found this terrarium very fascinating as it’s almost as if there are two separate worlds within the same glass demijohn. The algae underground creates a unique habitat, which couldn’t possibly exist in nature due to the fact the glass ensured that light could reach the soil underground. This allowed algaes, moss and fungi to flourish, alongside any of the smaller invertebrates that lived among them. Adult isopods seem to inhabit the surface and rarely venture below ground. I believe this is due to the hardness of the clay and rock substrate. The babies do seem to venture underground though, likely using tunnels left behind by earthworms many years ago.

Destin of SmarterEveryDay got to take a ride-along in a Thunderbird. They’d planned on doing a 9 G maneuver, but he had to tap out after 7.2 G’s rattled his inner ears.

 

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